Mid-Town Favorite Beef

Second generation family run business

About Mid-Town Favorite Beef

Since our humble beginnings, Mid-Town has expanded its coverage area to include Worcester, most of Northern Worcester County and Southern New Hampshire. 

Mid-Town Beef Co. Inc., was purchased in 1974 by the Bouvier Family and became a father and son operation. Father Donald and Son Paul operated the growing business together for the next four years at which time brother Steven joined the team. Together they successfully managed and grew the “custom cut wholesale meat business” creating a fully USDA operation servicing the Greater Twin City area. Eventually the business was expanded to include a broadline of products to better service their customers. Over the years the Bouviers created lifelong relationships with their valued customers. The philosophy of this company was to service with integrity and value. Throughout the years many members of the family filled various positions within the company sticking with the family values they believed in.

In 2015 Mid-Town Beef Co. was purchased by the Barstow family who owns and operates Favorite Foods, Inc. an independently owned and operated broadline foodservice distributor located in Somersworth, New Hampshire. It was important to the Bouvier Family that the company was purchased by a family that has strong business ethics, values and social responsibility. Paul Bouvier will remain on with Mid-Town Favorite Beef, LLC as the Operations Manager and an integral part of the future of the company.

Custom Cuts

Fully Cleaned Top Round

A round steak is a beef steak from the “round”, the rear leg of the cow. The round is divided into cuts including the eye (of) round, bottom round, and top round, with or without the “round” bone (femur), and may include the knuckle (sirloin tip), depending on how the round is separated from the loin.

Porterhouse Steak

Porterhouse steaks are cut from the rear end of the short loin and thus include more tenderloin steak, along with (on the other side of the bone) a large strip steak.

Bone in Rib-eye Steak (Cowboy)

A rib-eye bone in steak that is fine-grained and juicy. Rich, beefy flavor and generous marbling throughout. One of the most tender beef cuts.

Bone in Rib-eye French Bone

A rib-eye steak is a beef steak sliced from the rib primal of a beef animal, with rib bone attached.

Delmonico Steak (Center Ribeye)

Delmonico steak refers to a method of preparation from one of several cuts of beef (typically the Rib Cut) prepared Delmonico style.

Center Cut Filet Mignon

The most tender beef cut. Lean yet succulent, elegant and convenient. Buttery texture, subtle flavor and compact shape.

Sirloin Steak

Family-sized steak that offers lean, well-flavored and moderately tender beef at an affordable every day price. Convenient and a great value with no bones and little fat. Versatile, juicy and delicious.

Rib Roast Tied with Delmonico Steaks

A beef roast from the rib section between the short loin and the chuck. Accompanied with a Delmonico Steak.

Top Round Roast Tied

Economical, moderately tender roast. The whole top round weighs approximately 15-17 pounds.

Pot Roast Tied

Economical, moderately tender roast. The whole top round weighs approximately 15-17 pounds.

Rib Roast Tied

Tender juicy flavor. Prime rib cut.

Lamb Rack French Bone

Rack of lamb is often “Frenched”, that is, the rib bones are exposed by cutting off the fat and meat covering them. Typically, three inches of bone beyond the main muscle are left on the rack, with the top two inches exposed.

Lamb Rack with Lamb Chops

A rack of lamb is a cut of lamb cut perpendicularly to the spine, and including 16 ribs or chops. Can be sold ‘single’ (sawn longitudinally and including the 8 ribs on one side only), but may also be sold as a “double rack of lamb”, with the ribs on both sides.

Lamb Chops

Freshly chopped lamb cuts.

Veal Porterhouse

Veal Porterhouse Chop is lean and tender. Cut to a perfect portion that is sure to satisfy any appetite!

Tenderloin Tips

Tender meat of the muscle running through the sirloin and terminating before the ribs.

Pork Chops

Pork chops cut perpendicularly to the spine of the pig and usually containing a rib or part of a vertebra, served as an individual portion.

Pork Chops French Bone

Pork chop cuts away from the end of a rib or chop, so that part of the bone is exposed.

Bone in Pork Sirloin

Cut from the back portion of a pork loin that is left when the centre loin is removed by a straight cut down in front of the hipbone. A small portion of tenderloin may be included on the bottom.

Packaging

What are the benefits of vacuum sealing our meats?

Traditionally, vacuum-sealed packaging has been used to keep cured meats like bacon and hot dogs fresh. Mid-Town Favorite Beef utilizes this type of packaging for the many benefits it brings to keeping meat fresh.

All of our meat packaging and refrigeration is designed to protect against exposure to oxygen and heat; which breeds the bacteria causing spoilage. Keeping meats chilled and wrapped in plastic only addresses half of the problem, as traditional plastic wraps allow oxygen to penetrate packaging. Implementing vacuum-sealed packaging essentially increases the meats shelf-life by removing most of the oxygen, inhibiting the growth of bacteria.

Vacuum-sealed packaging gives the end user the freedom to cook meats according to their own timetable. With the oxygen removed, the shelf-life of vacuum sealed red meat increases from a few days to at least two weeks.  Because of this extended time period spoilage is significantly decreased, meaning less items thrown away.  This also includes ground beef, which inherently needs to be used within a day or two of purchase, but now has a shelf-life nearly double the amount of time from the use of vacuum packaging.

Meat that has to be thrown out is a substantial loss of time, energy, and money. By increasing the products shelf-life, the urgency to freeze your meats right away to keep them from going bad is no longer a priority; however freezing is still an option if you’re looking to stock up.  Vacuum-sealed packaging compliments the freezing process as the lack of oxygen on the surface of the meat prevents freezer burn and eliminates the necessity to have additional packaging and preparation for storage.  Additionally vacuum-sealed meats not only keeps the oxygen out, but also keeps juices in minimizing the cross-contamination with other foods.

Visually, meats that have been vacuum-sealed will be noticeably different from those packaged in a conventional manner. Vacuum-sealed meats will have a darker hue as opposed to the bright red color that is representative with traditional packaging. What does this all mean?  The red color represents the beginning of the meats spoiling process due to the exposure to oxygen.  Meats with the darker complexion are protected due to the vacuum-sealing process. Once opened the meats will be exposed to oxygen and will redden to the usual color.  This small cosmetic change in meat color is trivial when compared to the benefit in the products freshness and quality.